Projects

Salvage of autocarrier Tricolor
Salvage of autocarrier Tricolor

The 190m Tricolor sank in 30 metres of water, along with its cargo of approximately 3000 cars as a result of a collision.  It was eventually declared a total loss.  In December 2002, the French authorities ordered the removal of the wreck and this task fell to the consortium "CBT" consisting of Scaldis Salvage & Marine Contractors and three other companies.

Because the vessel was too large and heavy to be lifted or returned to an upright position in one piece CBT engineered a special salvage plan.  CBT used a specially designed wire cutting system to divide the wreck into nine sections.  The weight of the sections varied between 900 and 3000 tons.

T&I of two 5MW wind turbine generators for the Beatrice Demonstrator Project
T&I of two 5MW wind turbine generators for the Beatrice Demonstrator Project

The Beatrice Wind farm Demonstrator Project included the installation of two deepwater offshore wind turbines in an environmentally sensitive area of the Scottish coast.

Whereas most offshore wind turbines are put together offshore, the Beatrice wind turbines were constructed onshore.  The complete turbine was then lifted, transported and placed onto the pre-installed jacket by HLV Rambiz.

Installation of IKA-JZ jacket
Installation of IKA-JZ jacket

Scaldis has completed the installation of the IKA-JZ jacket for Saipem in Croatian waters.

The 73m-high tripod jacket was fabricated in Rijeka and transported horizontally on a barge to the offshore site. HLV Rambiz used both cranes to lift the jacket off the transport barge into the water. By means of flooding built-in buoyancy tanks, the jacket was seamlessly up-ended and positioned on the seabed using one crane. HLV Rambiz supported piling, grouting and miscellaneous assembly works in order to complete another faultless Scaldis offshore installation.

Decommissioning of the Welland platform
Decommissioning of the Welland platform

In 2010 Scaldis was contracted by Perenco UK limited to remove the Welland platform from the southern part of the North Sea.  The platform was to be re-used, while the supporting jacket structure was scrapped at a disposal yard.  The platform needed to be removed in January 2011.  In order to minimise the impact of the weather, Scaldis engineered various weather contingency systems so all available weather windows, no matter how short could be used.  Upon arrival of the HLV Rambiz, the deck was cut from the jacket using abrasive water jet cutting.  The jacket pins were dredged to four metres below seabed and cut using another abrasive cutting tool.

The deck was transported on a cargo barge, refurbished and re-lifted onto a jack-up barge several months later.  The jacket was lifted from the seabed and transported in the hooks of the HLV Rambiz to the scrappping yard.

Lifting, transportation and placement of 150 bridge elements for the Vasco da Gama bridge
Lifting, transportation and placement of 150 bridge elements for the Vasco da Gama bridge

The heavy-lifting programme for the bridge construction of this remarkeble project required the positioning of 150 girders, each with dimensions of 80x16m and weighing up to 2200 tonnes. The girders were transported on the large main deck under the two main cranes.

Salvage of the vessel Rokia Delmas
Salvage of the vessel Rokia Delmas

In 2007 Scaldis received the contract to remove the wreck of the Ro-Ro vessel Rokia Delmas.  This project was executed in a joint venture where Scaldis provide the HLV equipment.  The Rokia Delmas was stranded on the coast of Ile de Ré following a black out of its main engine.  The most important task was to avoid any pollution from the wreck reaching local beaches.

The HLV Rambiz together with auxilary equipment cut the Rokia Delmas in several sections, using hydraulic scissors.  The sections were then removed using slings and shackles connected to pre-installed bollards.  The heaviest section was the engine room.  To lift this section the main engine was removed first and the remaining 2800 ton section was lifted with belly chain rigging.  For the smaller sections a large grab was used.

Lifting and installation of a current turbine generator
Lifting and installation of a current turbine generator

Scaldis installed a tidal turbine (1200T) in the Strangforth Lough, East coast Ireland in 2009.

The tidal turbine was lifted from a quayside in Belfast and partially loaded onto the deck of HLV Rambiz. Subsequently the tidal turbine was transported over sea to site and installed in the Strangforth Lough at neap tide.

T&I of the Elettra and Fauzia jackets
T&I of the Elettra and Fauzia jackets

Scaldis successfully installed the jackets for the gas platforms Elettra and Fauzia located in the Aegean Sea.

The tripod jackets, each between 700 and 800tonnes, were fabricated in Italy and transported via barges to the offshore site.

The Elettra jacket was installed in Croatian waters at a water depth of nearly 80m. Later the Fauzia jacket  was installed in Italian waters at a water depth of 67m.

Each jacket was lifted from the barge by HLV Rambiz and lowered into the water in a horizontal floating position.  With assistance of divers and ROV the jacket legs were submerged and the jacket was upended by the Rambiz cranes and set in position.

The foundation piles, all between 60 and 67m, were lifted into the sleeves and piled to target depth.  Grout was installed with the assistance of HLV Rambiz.

 

 

Removal of the Camelot platform
Removal of the Camelot platform

In 2011 Scaldis was contracted by Helix USA to remove the Camelot platform from the southern part of the North Sea at the end of July 2012. The Camelot platform was located +/- 25 Nm offshore Great Yarmouth in UK waters. Both platform (weight of +/- 1200 tonnes) as well as supporting jacket structure (+/- 700 tonnes) needed to be scrapped at a disposal yard.

Upon arrival of the HLV Rambiz, the deck was cut from the jacket using flame cutting. The jacket piles were dredged to 4 metres below seabed and cut using an internal abrasive water jet cutting tool. The deck was transported on a cargo barge to the scrapping yard. The jacket was lifted from the seabed and transported in the hooks of the HLV Rambiz to the scrapping yard.

Immerge, towing and installation of tunnel elements for the Coentunnel 2
Immerge, towing and installation of tunnel elements for the Coentunnel 2

This project involved re-floating, transportation, submerging, and positioning of four concrete tunnel segments. The segments were then stabilised by inserting sand underneath them.

Wreckremoval of the New Flame
Wreckremoval of the New Flame

In 2009 Scaldis designed, engineered and fabricated a lifting arrangement for the removal of the stern section including the main engine of the New Flame bulkcarrier which sunk near the rock of Gibraltar.

The section was first rigged with messenger wires assisted by ROV and divers.  The rigging, including heavy chain and slings, was installed after the arrival of HLV Rambiz. The chains and the messenger wires pulled the section into the correct position.  The 2850 ton stern section was lifted, stabilised and moved, suspended from Rambiz cranes to the port of Gibraltar before being lifted onto a pontoon for further transport to the scrapyard.

T&I of Ormonde jackets and SSP
T&I of Ormonde jackets and SSP

Scaldis was awarded the contract, along with GeoSea, its sister company, to transport and install substructures for 5MW wind turbines in the Ormonde field. Additionally,HLV Rambiz and Swiber Else Marie installed 31 jackets in pre-installed piles in the Irish Sea, offshore Barrow in Furness, UK.

The Ormonde wind farm construction started in the spring of 2010.  The scope of work included : 

  • transportation, installation and measuring of pin piles (GeoSea)
  • transportation and installation of jackets including grouting (Scaldis)
  • lifting and placing of the substation deck (Scaldis)

Scaldis transported the 31 WTG foundation jackets and substation jacket on extended North Sea barges from the fabrication yard on the northeast coast of the UK to the mid-west coast.  Each barge contained four jackets, positioned vertically.  Once on site the HLV Rambiz lifted the jackets from the barge and inserted them in the pre-installed piles.  Once a jacket was placed, a separate DP II grout vessel inserted grout into the annulus between jacket and piles.  Finally the 1000 ton substation deck was lifted by HLV Rambiz onto the substation jacket foundation.

 

T&I of the L6-B minimum facility platform
T&I of the L6-B minimum facility platform

Wintershall Noordzee B.V. contracted Scaldis Marine Contractors NV to install the L6-B platform, in water 35m deep. The platform is 25NM north west of Terschelling, the Netherlands, in the Dutch sector of the North Sea.

Wintershall and Scaldis jointly developed a methodology that focused on minimising the duration of all offshore activities.  This is because the duration of the offshore activities automatically reduces risk and overall costs.

The newly developed methodology covers the transportation and installation of the complete flatform to the site.

The complete platform will be collected from a quayside in Rotterdam by the HLV Rambiz which has a capacity of 3.300 tons.  A special tool has been developed with hydraulic opening doors to enclose the platform mast. Rigging will be connected, via hydraulic shackles to the suction cans at the bottom part of the foundation.  The structure will then be lifted from the quayside into the hooks of the HLV Rambiz and transported to the installation site.

Upon arrival on-site, HLV Rambiz will moor in the correct position and orientation.  The complete platform will be lowered until the suction cans reach the seabed.  Scaldis has subcontracted SPT to execute the actual suction operations.

By reducing the pressure in the voids inside the suction cans, the suction cans will penetrate the seabed until they have reached the target depth of 10 metres.  This methodology is fast, efficient and environmentally friendly.  Upon completion of the section operation, the platform inclination will be verified.

The rigging connection will then be disconnected, the hydraulic spreader bar door opened and released from the structure.

 

 

Removal of the K10-B platform
Removal of the K10-B platform

In June 2014, HLV Rambiz started the offshore removal phase of project K10-B. During this phase the bridge, the wellhead platform and the living quarters were removed. All items except the wellhead jacket were transported to the dismantling yard by barge. The wellhead jacket was lifted from the seabed and transported in the hooks of the HLV Rambiz to the dismantling yard. The Rambiz had to leave the K10-B field at this point due to other commitments. Further removal of the production platform was scheduled to be executed in September 2014.

Lifting and installation of a drilling tower onto the Globetrotter II
Lifting and installation of a drilling tower onto the Globetrotter II

This lifting operation was executed at the premises of Huisman in Rotterdam (Schiedam), the Netherlands. The project consisted of lifting the 2600 tons drilling tower from its construction quay and transporting it to its designated location on the drilling vessel "Globetrotter II".

A three point lifting configuration constructed far below the centre of gravity made this project unique and challenging.  The inclination of the entire structure had to be continuously monitored in order to guarantee, the stability of the lifting configuration.

Comprehensive preparation in coordination with Huisman made this lifting operation a success.

Lifting and placing of gravity based foundations for the Karehamn Wind farm
Lifting and placing of gravity based foundations for the Karehamn Wind farm

In September 2012 HLV Rambiz installed 16 gravity based foundations (GBF) in the Swedish part of the Baltic Sea, East of the Isle of Oland, in the vicinity of Karehamn.

The on-site water depths varies from 8 to 21 metres which meant that all foundations had different dimensions and weights.  The heaviest foundation was over 1950 tonnes and a height of 24,5 metres.

The foundations were fabricated by Jan De Nul and constructed directly onto 2 large pontoons in Zeebrugge harbour in Belgium.  The largest pontoon contained 12 foundations and the smallest pontoon had 4 foundations.  From the harbour the pontoons were towed to the location in Sweden, where Rambiz lifted the foundations from the pontoons and placed them onto the prepared seabed.

Decomm. of the Draugen Floating Loading Platform (FLP)
Decomm. of the Draugen Floating Loading Platform (FLP)

The Draugen Floating Loading Platform (FLP) has been in operation in the Draugen Field, Norway since 1993. It was removed from the offshore site and moored temporarily in Bømlafjord (Kvaerner Stord base), Norway, for further dismantling.

HLV Rambiz removed the helideck and topside from the spar, and positioned them onshore at Kvaerner decommissioning yard for further dismantling.

Kvaerner pre-installed a subsea lifting frame at the bottom end of the spar. With Rambiz alongside the rigging for the spar downending was connected to the subsea lifting frame. Rambiz lifted up the bottom end, while a steering tug controlled the heading of the top of the spar coming down. After completion of the downending into the horizontal floating position, the spar was transported suspended in the Rambiz cranes to the Kvaerner dry-dock. Then the  spar was placed in the dock for further dismantling. 

Lifting of 2 modules onto a FPSO vessel
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Lifting of 2 modules onto a FPSO vessel

Rambiz lifted a Boiler (800T) and a STG (600T) module onto the FPSO "Enquest Producer" in the Blohm+Voss yard in Hamburg. One module was located on the quayside and the other was on a floating dock.

HLV Rambiz positioned both modules with an accuracy of millimetres.

Installation of jacket, piles and topside for Borkum Riffgrund 1 substation
Installation of jacket, piles and topside for Borkum Riffgrund 1 substation

Dong Energy A/S awarded Scaldis the contract for transportation and installation of the Borkum Riffgrund 1 Offshore wind farm substation which is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea approximately 20NM north of the German island of Borkum.

Scaldis transported the substation jacket, eight piles and topside by barge from Aalborg (Denmark) to the offshore site in August 2013.  At the site HLV Rambiz lifted and installed the nearly 1700 tonnes jacket, placed and piled to depth the eight foundations piles, grouted the jacket sleeves and lifted the 1850 tonnes topside onto the jacket.

During the piling operations a bubble screen was used to reduce the noise.  The operations were successfully and quickly completed.

Installation of the Amrumbank West substation
Installation of the Amrumbank West substation

In April and May 2014, Scaldis executed the complete offshore installation of the Amrumbank West wind farm substation. This substation, owned by E.o.N. is located in the German Bight, the German North Sea sector. Scaldis was responsible for lifting and placing jacket foundation on the seabed, four pile lifts, upending, stabbing and hammering piles to penetration depth; noise mitigation during piling works; jacket levelling, grouting and lastly lifting the topside onto the jacket foundation.

Some project specifications :

  • Weight of the Amrumbank jacket        : 980 tonnes
  • Pile specifications                               : W = 165 tonnes, Ø = 96”, L = 54m
  • Weight of the Amrumbank topside      : 2100 tonnes

 

Challenges overcome during this project include :

  • Working outside the offshore season in the German Bight sector, which is known for    unfavourable weather conditions.
  • Designing lifting arrangements to make maximum use of Rambiz capacities for pile    upending and topside lift operations.
Installation of the Butendiek substation
Installation of the Butendiek substation

In April 2014, Scaldis executed the complete offshore installation of the Butendiek wind farm substation.

This substation, owned by Wpd, is located in the German Bight, the German North Sea sector. Scaldis was responsible for liffting and placing of the jacket foundation on the seabed; four pile lifts, upending, stabbing and hammering piles to penetration depth; noise mitigation during piling works, jacket levelling, grouting, and lastly lifting the topside onto the jacket foundation.

 

Some project specifications:

  • Weightof the  Butendiek jacket              : 1032 tonnes
  • Pile specification                                    : W = 238 tonnes, Ø = 96”, L = 61m
  • Weight of the Butendiek topside            : 2250 tonnes

 

Challenges overcome during this project include : 

  • Working outside the offshore season in the German Bight sector, which is known for    unfavourable weather conditions.
  • Designing lifting arrangements to make maximum use of Rambiz' capacities for pile  upending and topside lift operations.
Installation of the Nordsee Ost jacket and topside
Installation of the Nordsee Ost jacket and topside

RWE contracted Scaldis for the lift-off, transport and set down of the 800 tons Nordsee Ost substation jacket.

Rambiz lifted the jacket from the quayside in Wilhelmshaven, Germany and secured it in the vessel's crane hook for transport to the offshore site, a distance of approx. 68NM.

Exactly one year after HLV Rambiz successfully completed the installation of the Nordsee Ost substation jacket, the vessel returned to install the Nordsee Ost topside.

RWE contracted Scaldis for the transportation and installation of the 2000 tons transfo station.

The topside was transported on a barge from Bladt Industries fabrication yard in Aalborg to the Nordsee Ost field, 390NM away in the German Bight.  

12 hours after the barge arrived in the field, HLV Rambiz lifted and installed the topside.

Installation subsea jacket for Baltic II offshore substation
Installation subsea jacket for Baltic II offshore substation

In August 2014 Scaldis installed the subsea jacket for the Baltic II offshore substation. The jacket was manufactured by Weserwind in Bremerhaven and towed to the offshore location in the Baltic Sea.

The jacket is a four legged structure weighing 1500 tons. After installation, the top of the jacket is approximately 5 m below sea level. This clearance is needed to allow the installation of the float-over substation. A pile (80.3 m long with a diameter of 5m) was installed in each of the four jacket sleeves.

As the pile diameter was much bigger than standard for jacket foundation piles, a custom-made upending frame was designed to assist the Rambiz with this task. Once in a vertical position, the piles were stabbed into the jacket sleeve. Due to limited self-penetration and the height of the piles, the Rambiz was equipped with a newly designed pile frame on the bow of the vessel. Once the pile was secured in the frame, it was hammered 65m into the seabed in order to have enough holding capacity for the jacket. All four piles were grouted to the jacket to make the rigid structure safe for the substation installation. After the grouting was completed, the submerged rigging platform was removed with ROV assistance and the Rambiz left the site.

T&I Luchterduinen topside
T&I Luchterduinen topside

In February 2015 the barge Louis loaded with the Luchterduinen OHVS module was towed from Hoboken, Belgium to Ijmuiden, The Netherlands.  A few days later when the Rambiz sailed into the port of Ijmuiden the barge Louis was turned perpendicular in the Ijmondhaven. Rambiz connected to the barge and lifted the rigging up onto her deck.

Four Scaldis riggers were transferred to the barge by gangway.  They climbed to the top of the OVHS module and installed the rigging.  This consisted of 4x 600 tons hydraulic shackles that needed to be connected to the OHVS padeyes.  After all the rigging was connected and pre-tensioned to 50% of the load, the 16 bolts of the seafastening, four on each support, were disconnected and the OHVS was lifted out of its supports.

The Rambiz was unmoored from the barge and moored at the Monnickendamkade. The cranes from the Rambiz were boomed up and two of four stabbing pins of the OHVS module were lowered into the customised frames on the Rambiz' bow.  The load in the cranes was reduced until 75 tons of the OHVS weight was resting on each support.

After resting the module, the Rambiz waited for three hours as adviced by the port authorities due to high currents when sailing out.  At around 22:00 the pilot came on board and Rambiz sailed to the Luchterduinen field with the module suspended in her crane hooks.

Upon arrival in the field Rambiz anchored with the assistance of her own tug Multratug 4

Two floating wires were used on the Rambiz bow anchor wires to keep sufficient clearance of the previously installed in-field and export cables.  When all four anchors were installed an anchor test was performed to check the holding capacity of the anchor pattern.  After the succesful test, Rambiz shifted towards the monopile and lifted the OHVS module free of her deck.  The OHVS module was lifted above the catchers, installed on the monopile, positioned and lowered into place.  After touchdown of the OHVS module, the load was partly reduced and three Scaldis riggers were transferred to the OHVS module via a man basket.

The Scaldis riggers disconnted all four hydraulic shackles and retrieved the rigging before returning to the Rambiz.  Multratug 4 and Rambiz retrieved all four anchors and sailed to Flushing.  

HLV Rambiz was on-site for 24 hours, during which time the entire offshore installation was completed.

The major advantages of this approach are the limited time needed offshore and the reduced risk by connecting rigging in sheltered waters.

T&I of Gemini substations
T&I of Gemini substations

The Gemini project is the construction of two offshore wind farms, the ZeeEnergie and Buitengaats, in the Netherlands.  Scaldis was awarded the transportation and installation of both offshore high voltage substations.

The jackets were fabricated and loaded onto a barge in Flushing and the topsides were transported from Hoboken to the field. Scaldis was responsible for transportation of the barges, the installation of the jackets, the piling and grouting works and the installation of the topsides.

Thanks to comprehensive preparation, a good cooperation with the clients and an experienced crew and sub-contractors, the project was completed as planned and on time. 

Flinterstar's bow successfully lifted from sea
Flinterstar's bow successfully lifted from sea

After being awarded the contract in April 2016, Scaldis immediately started the preparations and the mobilisation of the equipment to ensure a rapid response. Removing the cargo from the hold was the first step, whilst in parallel lifting chains were attached to the bow section of the Flinterstar. On 27th June 2016 all preparatory operations were finished and the lifting commenced. The lifting activities are progressing slowly as planned, due to the fact the water in the hold needs to be pumped out. Health, safety and environmental considerations are of paramount importance. During operations an oil containment vessel was active to capture the small amount of gas oil that was released. After the removal of the water, the bow has been placed on a bespoke pontoon ready for transport. Following seafastening of the bow section the pontoon will be towed to Ghent to be recycled. The stern of the ship is planned to be lifted and removed in August 2016

Flinterstar's aft section successfully removed
Flinterstar's aft section successfully removed

The recent removal of Flinterstar’s aft section marks the successful completion of the offshore salvage works of the M/V Flinterstar. This project was undertaken in a difficult environment due to the proximity of one of the world’s busiest traffic lanes and strong currents that impeded underwater works. Even so, this salvage project was realised well ahead of deadline, namely the upcoming winter storm season.

The approach for lifting the aft wreck section, which weighed more than 3000 tonnes, was similar to the raising of the forward section: chains were pulled underneath the wreck section, connected to the upper rigging in the Rambiz’ hooks before the combination was raised and placed on a submersible barge for the final lifting stage. The Port of Zeebrugge was an ideal sheltered location for the final phase of the salvage operation.

Given the collision is still subject to a court investigation, this project was executed in close cooperation with, and witnessed by, several federal and local authorities, all of which required tight project management and communication. Furthermore, care was taken to prevent and control the outflow of oil during the salvage operations, with two standby oil skim vessels and additional oil spill barriers available and in use during operations in port.

Scaldis SMC appreciates the full commitment of all involved stakeholders, and believes their dedication was a key factor in the success of this project.

Scaldis SMC is proud to have carried out this salvage operation within the agreed timeframe and budget, again proving itself to be a reliable salvage contractor.

 

Installation of the Rampion jacket
Installation of the Rampion jacket

Thanks to the good weather conditions and swift installation and grouting operations, Scaldis SMC successfully installed the Rampion OSS jacket on the south coast of England well ahead of schedule..

Operations included turning the jacket while it was suspended and partially submerged. After the 90 degrees rotation, the 1000 tonne jacket structure was placed on the sea bottom, followed by the usual piling and grouting activities.

Marine mammal observation, as well as passive acoustic and noise monitoring, took place during the piling activities to ensure environmental standards were met.

HLV Rambiz will return to E.ON’s Rampion OWF field to install the OSS topside that is currently being fabricated by Babcock.

Blight Bank Transformer Station installed
Blight Bank Transformer Station installed
Every Scaldis project faces one challenge or another. When lifting the Blight Bank transformer station (1000 tonne) , the challenge wasn’t the weight, the position of the centre of gravity or limiting clearances. Instead it was the preparation, approval and execution of an anchor lay-out in a live wind farm field. For every anchor wire deployed by the Rambiz, Scaldis had to guarantee sufficient clearance for crossing the different infield cables and export cable. To safely achieve this, we used a four-point mooring system with four midline buoys, two floatable mooring ropes and two pre-laid anchors.
Liftting of a tiltable pipe lay system
Liftting of a tiltable pipe lay system
The lifting operation was executed on October 4, 2016 at Huisman in Rotterdam (Schiedam), the Netherlands. The 2430 tonne tiltable pipe lay system was lifted from its construction location on the Huisman quay, transported to its designated location on the Scanid Buzios and put into position. It was a challenging project as all this was carried out with a maximum allowable tilt of 0.4°, limited space for HLV in the harbour and a 2mm tolerance for installation. Huisman’s preparation and the impressive cooperation between Scaldis and Huisman ensured that this challenging project was a success.
Stacking operation at a yard in Norway
Stacking operation at a yard in Norway

Mid February 2017 Rambiz executed the stacking operation of a drilling module S-620 onto its substructure S-610 at a yard in Norway. Total weight of the drilling module was 1330 T.

Through a good cooperation between Rambiz crew and client an accuracy within millimeters could be achieved.

The complete drilling unit is part of the “Johan Sverdrup” offshore platform.

Scaldis decommissions offshore platform in 3 days
Scaldis decommissions offshore platform in 3 days

In April 2016 Tullow Oil awarded SCALDIS with the contract to remove the offshore Horne & Wren platform. SCALDIS immediately started the extensive preparations and engineering works.

The Plugging & Abandonment (P&A) of wells and offshore preparatory works were carried out from the jack-up vessel ‘Kraken’. While Simultaneous Operations (SIMOPS) of the P&A took place, our team also performed Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) of the topside pad eyes, installed an access platform between the jacket and topside and placed a gangway landing platform on the jacket.

RAMBIZ, our heavy lift vessel, was mobilized from Flushing, the Netherlands, on March 10, 2017 and arrived at the offshore field two days later. Over the following three days, the complete platform was decommissioned; an in- and out-seabed survey was carried out; the topside was cut, lifted and sea fastened onboard the RAMBIZ; the jacket piles were dredged and cut; the Internal Lifting Tools (ILT’s) were installed; and the jacket was lifted. The RAMBIZ returned to a disposal yard in Flushing with the topside stowed on deck and the jacket suspended in the PS crane.

“The joint team effort from all parties involved including the outstanding cooperation from the client was key to this successful project,” said Igor Mastenbroek, Project Manager at SCALDIS. “The beautiful weather, excellent crew, detailed preparations and our good alliance with Tullow Oil also helped us to safely execute the decommissioning well ahead of schedule.”

“It has been an absolute pleasure to work closely with the SCALDIS team,” said Darin Scales, Senior Project Engineer for Tullow Oil UK Ltd. “Throughout the project lifecycle, SCALDIS has exceeded expectations and I would definitely recommend them for similar projects in the future. It was a slick and seamless operation.”

SCALDIS’ first monopile installation without the use of a gripper frame or installation template
SCALDIS’ first monopile installation without the use of a gripper frame or installation template

Rambiz, Scaldis' heavy lift vessel, successfully installed the unmanned gas platform L13-FI for NAM. The lifting, upending, positioning and driving of the monopile foundation was carried out using the Vibro Lifting Tool. The verticality of the monopile was installed well within tolerance, without the use of a gripper frame or installation template. A vibro hammer drove the pile down to six meters before the target penetration, before an impact hammer completed the job. Scaldis then installed the column and topside.